English

Vision/Mission/Philosophy KS3/4/5

We aim to foster a love of the English language in our students. Teaching is focussed upon developing students’ skills in reading, writing and speaking and listening. We require students to engage with a wide range of literary and no-literary texts, produced over a range of time. Through exploring texts, students will engage with cultural, moral, social and spiritual issues.

By the time they leave Davenant, our students should be able to us the English language in their day-to-day lives, have the literacy required for them to succeed in the world of work and a knowledge and understanding of texts which will support their continued learning.

KS3 Curriculum Content

First half term: Novel

Second half term: Poetry

Third half term: Non-fiction writing

Fourth half term: Shakespeare

Fifth half term: Debating

Sixth half term: Creative writing

KS3 Assessment

Students are assessed at the end of each of the first four half terms by means of a one hour paper written under examination conditions. Speaking and listening is continuously assessed in class by teachers in the fifth half term. Students sit a two hour examination in the final half term consisting of an unseen reading paper and a writing paper.

 

KEY STAGE 4

AQA GCSE Language 

Students are assessed on their ability to understand how language is used to present ideas and opinions. Students will also be asked to use this understanding to create their own pieces of writing which achieve specific purposes and adhere to a prescribed form. As no texts are studied in full and all exam questions are based on unseen extracts, these exams are based entirely on a set of skills which the students will practice over their year 10 and 11 years.

Texts

  • No text books required. A variety of fiction and non-fictions texts (similar to those which might arise on the exam) will be provided by teachers in lesson.

Assessments

Paper One: Writer’s Viewpoints and Perspectives

  • Reading: Comprehension and evaluation questions based on unseen 19th-21st century fiction extract
  • Writing: Narrative creative writing based on  a written or visual prompt

Paper Two: Writers’ Viewpoints and Perspectives

  • Reading: Comprehension and comparison questions based on two non-fiction extracts (one pre-20th century, one 21st century)
  • Writing: Informative, persuasive, or advisory writing based on a written prompt

 

AQA GCSE Literature 

Students are assessed on their understanding of characters, themes, and key ideas presented in a variety of texts. Students will also be expected to comment on how writer’s present these features, and relate them to the context in which the texts were produced. All exams are closed book. 

 

Texts

  • Macbeth
  • The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde or A Christmas Carol
  • Animal Farm or The Lord of the Flies
  • AQA Anthology ‘Poems Past, Present, and Future’- Power and Conflict section

Assessments

  • Paper One: Shakespeare and the 19th Century Novel 
    • Shakespeare:  Thematic/character-based question on a given passage from Macbeth. Students will need to relate this passage to their understanding of the rest of the play.
    • 19th century novel: Thematic/character-based question on a given passage from either A Christmas Carol or The Strange Case of Doctor Jekyll and MrHyde. Students will need to relate this passage to their understanding of the rest of the novel.
  • Paper Two: Modern Texts and Poetry
    • Modern Texts: Students will chose between two thematic/character-based questions on a given passage from either Animal Farm or The Lord of the Flies. Students will need to relate this passage to their understanding of the rest of the novel.
    • Anthology Poetry: Comparative question on a selected poem from the anthology studied and one other anthology poem of the students’ choice.
    • Unseen Poetry: One comprehension and evaluation question on a provided unseen poem. One comparative question on two provided unseen poems.

KS5 Curriculum content

English Literature

(NB. This course cannot be studied with English Language and Literature).

Exam Board:               AQA English Literature B 

Head of Subject:         Mr Evans

Entry Requirements:   Grade 6 or above in English Language and Literature at GCSE.

What will you learn at A Level?

At A’ Level you will study a minimum of 8 substantial literary texts spread across the 2 years, 2 from each of the genres of poetry, prose and drama; 3 pre-1900 texts including 1 Shakespeare play, and 1 text first written or performed post-2000. You will also learn how to respond to unseen texts.

Works of prose, poetry and drama are examined with a view to developing critical skills and an understanding of context.

You will learn to make connections across texts and gain confidence in your use of literary, linguistic, and critical concepts.

A’ Level texts are studied in Year 12 and revisited in Year 13 with a different skills focus.

Which modules will you take?

Literary Genres: Tragedy. Exploration of tragedy in 3 texts (poetry, Shakespeare, and one other drama text)

Elements of Political Writing. An exploration of political and social protest writing in poetry and 2 prose texts.

Theory & Independence, 2 essays, each responding to a different text and different aspects of an anthology of critical material for non-exam assessment (assessed by teachers, moderated by AQA)

Where will this course lead?

An English A’ Level will provide you with a variety of skills that are essential for further study and a range of professional careers such as journalism, law, teaching, media, business, politics, diplomacy, and many others.

English Language and Literature (Combined)

(NB. This course cannot be studied with English Literature).

Exam Board:               AQA English Language and Literature

Head of Subject:         Mr Evans

Entry Requirements: Grade 6 or above in both English Language and English Literature

What will you learn at A Level?

The course draws on the academic field of stylistics, where you will study a range of literary texts and non-literary extracts which have been produced by a variety of writers working in different centuries. The focus of study is on the significance of place, point of view, and genre in prose texts; the forms and functions of poetic voice; the individual in society, and conflict in drama.

You will learn how to creatively recast texts into different genres, and on developing your research and writing skills.

Works of literature and non- fiction extracts are examined with a view to developing your critical and creative skills in writing, You will learn to make connections between texts and gain confidence in your use of literary and linguistic terminology.

A’ Level texts are studied in Year 12 and revisited in Year 13 with a different skills focus.

Which modules will you take?

Telling Stories in prose fiction (novel), poetry, and a range of literary and non-literary extracts

Exploring Conflict: a re-creative response to prose fiction (novel) and associated commentary

Conflict in Drama: an exploration of conflict in a drama text

A personal investigation into a specific technique or theme in literary and non-literary discourse for non-exam assessment (assessed by teachers, moderated by AQA)

Where will this course lead?

An English A’ Level will provide you with a variety of skills that are essential for further study and a range of professional careers such as journalism, law, teaching, media, business, politics, diplomacy, and many others.